Anti-GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) mAb

  • Applications
    • ICC
    • IHC
    • IP
    • WB
  • Target GFP
  • Host Species Mouse
  • Code # M048-3
  • Size 100 μg
  • Price
    $245.07
Specifications

Background

Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) tagging provide an excellent means for monitoring gene expression and protein localization in living cells, so that it is widely accepted by molecular and cell biological research. Monoclonal anti-GFP antibody can detect GFP and its variants on Western blotting, Immunoprecipitation and Immunocytochemistry.
  • Antibody Type:
    Monoclonal
  • Application:
    ICC, IHC, IP, WB
  • Clone Number:
    100000
  • Concentration:
    1 mg/mL
  • Conjugate:
    Unlabeled
  • Description:

    Monoclonal Antibody of 100 μg targeting GFP for ICC, IHC, IPP, WB.

  • Formulation:
    100 μg IgG in 100 μl volume of PBS containing 50% glycerol, pH 7.2. No preservative is contained.
  • Host Species:
    Mouse
  • Immunogen:
    Full-length recombinant GFP protein (246 a.a.)
  • Isotype:
    IgG2b
  • Product Type:
    Antibody
  • Reactivity:
    This antibody reacts with GFP on Western blotting, Immunoprecipitation and Immunocytochemistry. It reacts with EBFP, SEBFP, ECFP, SECFP, EGFP, SEGFP cpSEGFP, EYFP, Venus, cpVenus, R-pericam, and Sapphire.
  • Research Area:
    Fluorescent Proteins
  • Short Description:
    GFP Monoclonal Antibody.
  • Size:
    100 μg
  • Storage Temperature:
    -20°C
  • Target:
    GFP
Citations
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  22. Song Z et al. Direct interaction between survivin and Smac/DIABLO is essential for the anti-apoptotic activity of survivin during taxol-induced apoptosis. J Biol Chem. 278, 23130-40 (2003),
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References
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  2. Banerjee, S., et al., Neuron 64, 871-884 (2009)
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  9. Konstantopoulos-Kontrogianni, A., et al., Am. J. Physiol. Cell Physiol. 287, C209-C217 (2004)
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  11. Hisatsune, C., et al., J. Biol. Chem. 279, 18887-18894 (2004)
  12. Pottekat, A., et al., J. Biol. Chem. 279, 15743-15751 (2004)
  13. Lozupone, F., et al., J. Biol. Chem. 279, 9199-9207 (2004)
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