Anti-RAGE (Human) mAb

  • Applications
    • FCM
    • WB
  • Target RAGE
  • Host Species Mouse
  • Species Reactivities Human
  • Code # CY-M1041
  • Size 100 μg
  • Price
    $501.28
Specifications

Background

RAGE is a multi-ligand member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules that is expressed in a variety of cell lines, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, mononuclear phagocytes, pericytes, neurons, cardiac myocytes, mesangial cells and hepatocytes (1, 2). RAGE interacts with different structures to transmit a signal into the cell and recognizes three-dimensional structures rather than specific amino acid sequences. Therefore, RAGE seems to fulfill the requirements of a pattern-recognition receptor. As a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, it interacts with a diverse class of ligands, including AGEs (3, 4), HMGB1 (also known as Amphoterin) (5), amyloid β-peptide (6), amyloid A (7), leukocyte adhesion receptors (8), prions (9), Escherichia coli curli operons (10), β-sheet fibrils (11) and several members of the S100 protein superfamily including S100/calgranulins (12). Thus RAGE may have potential involvement in several pathological processes including inflammation, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), systemic amyloidosis, and tumor growth (13).
  • Antibody Type:
    Monoclonal
  • Application:
    FCM, WB
  • Clone Number:
    KH-2G12
  • Concentration:
    1.0 μg/μL
  • Conjugate:
    Unlabeled
  • Description:

    Monoclonal Antibody of 100 μg targeting RAGE for WB, FCM.

  • Formulation:
    Supplied in 20 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.5), 300 mM NaCl, 50 % glycerol.
  • Host Species:
    Mouse
  • Immunogen:
    recombinant extacellular domain of human RAGE
  • Isotype:
    IgG1
  • Product Type:
    Antibody
  • Research Area:
    Metabolism
  • Short Description:

    Anti-RAGE (Human) Monoclonal Antibody.

  • Size:
    100 μg
  • Species Reactivity:
    Human
  • Storage Temperature:
    -20°C
  • Target:
    RAGE
References
  1. Neeper M, Schmidt AM, Brett J et al.. J Biol Chem 1992, 267: 14998-5004
  2. Brett J, Schmidt AM, Yan SD et al. Am J Pathol 1993, 143: 1699-712
  3. Neeper M, Schmidt AM, Brett J, et al. J Biol Chem 1992, 267: 14998-15004
  4. Schmidt AM, Vianna M, Gerlach M, et al. J Biol Chem 1992, 267: 14987-14997
  5. Hori O, Brett J, Slattery T, Cao R et al. J Biol Chem 1995, 270: 25752-25761
  6. Yan SD, Zhu H, Fu J, Yan SF, Roher A et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1997, 94: 5296-5301
  7. Yan SD, Zhu H, Zhu A, Golabek A, Du H, Roher A, Yu J, Soto C, Schmidt AM, Stern D, et al. Nat Med 2000, 6: 643-651
  8. Chavakis T, Bierhaus A, Al-Fakhri N et al. J Exp Med 2003, 198: 1507-1515
  9. Sasaki N, Takeuchi M, Chowei H, Kikuchi S et al Neurosci Lett 2002, 326: 117-120
  10. Chapman MR, Robinson LS, Pinkner JS et al. Science 2002, 295: 851-855
  11. Bierhaus A, Humpert PM, Morcos M, et al. J Mol Med 2005, 83: 876- 886
  12. Hofmann MA, Drury S, Fu C, Qu W et al. Cell 1999, 97: 889-901
  13. Stern DM, Yan SD, Yan SF, and Schmidt AM. Ageing Res Rev. 2002, 1: 1-15