Human IL-18 ELISA Kit

  • Applications
    • ELISA
  • Code # 7620
  • Size 96 Wells
  • Price
    $595.00
Specifications

Background

Interleukin 18 (IL-18) is an 18 kDa cytokine which is identified as a costimulatory factor for production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in response to toxic shock. It shares functional similarities with IL-12. IL-18 is synthesized as a precursor 24 kDa molecule without a signal peptide and must be cleaved to produce an active molecule. IL-1β converting enzyme (ICE, caspase-1) cleaves pro-IL-18 at aspartic acid in the P1 position, producing the mature, bioactive peptide that is readily released from the cells. It has been reported that IL-18 is produced from dendritic cells, activated macrophages, Kupffer cells, keratinocytes, intestinal epithelial cells, osteoblasts, adrenal cortex cells and murine diencephalons. IFN- is produced by activated T and NK cells and plays critical roles in the defense against microbial pathogens. IFN-γ activates macrophages, enhances NK activity and B cell maturation, proliferation and Ig secretion, induces MHC class I and II antigens expression, and inhibits osteoclast activation. IL-18 acts on T helper 1-type (Th1) cells, and in combination with IL-12 strongly induces production of IFN-γ by these cells. Pleiotropic effects of IL-18 have also been reported, including enhancement production of IFN-γ and GM-CSF in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, production of Th1 cytokines, IL-2, GM-CSF and IFN-γ in T cells, enhancement of Fas ligand expression by Th1 cells. The “Human IL-18 ELISA Kit” is a useful reagent for specifically measuring human IL-18 with high sensitivity by ELISA. This Kit does not detect 1 ng/mL of various cytokines, such as human IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, GM-CSF and murine IL-18. The results were all bellow the detection limit of 12.5 pg/mL.
  • Application:
    ELISA
  • Components:
    Microwell strips coated with anti-Human IL-18 antibody 8-well strip ◊ 12strips Human IL-18 calibrator (Lyophilized) 2 vials Conjugate reagent (Peroxidase conjugate anti-Human IL-18 monoclonal antibody) ( x 101) 0.2mL ◊ 1vial Conjugate diluent (ready to use) 24mL ◊ 1vial Assay diluent (ready to use) 30mL ◊ 1vial Wash concentrate ( x 10) 100mL ◊ 1vial Substrate reagent (TMB/H2O2) (ready to use) 20mL ◊ 1vial Stop solution (2N H2SO4) (ready to use) (irritant) 18mL ◊ _vial
  • Description:

    The Human Il-18 ELISA Kit is based on sandwich ELISA and is capable of measuring human Il-18. This kit has a high sensitivity (12.5 pg/ml) and has over 60 citations.

    In regard to diseases, high levels of IL-18 are detected in the blood of patients with allergic diseases (bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis) and those with autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], adult Still’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Chrohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis). IL-18 is also found in the urine of patients with acute renal disorder and appears to mediate the progression of type 2 diabetes.

  • Gene ID (Human):
  • Gene ID (Mouse):
  • Product Type:
    ELISA Kit
  • Sensitivity:
    12.5pg/ml
  • Short Description:
    The Human IL-18 ELISA Kit is based on sandwich ELISA and is capable of measuring human IL-18
  • Size:
    96 Wells
  • Storage Temperature:
    4C
Citations
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